Wednesday, 30 May 2012

Darrell Rohl - Career Interview

Where did you graduate and what are you doing now?
I received my first degree (BSc in Behavioral Sciences with an emphasis in Anthropological Archaeology, Summa Cum Laude) in 2007 from Andrews University in Michigan, USA. In 2009 I graduated from a Masters programme (MA Archaeology-Roman, with distinction) at Durham University, and have stayed in Durham for my PhD, which is currently nearing its end. My thesis is a chorography/archaeology of place of the Roman Antonine Wall in Scotland.

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When you graduated were you looking for a career in archaeology?
Yes! Archaeology is actually a second career for me, as I previously spent seven years in the technology consulting industry. I had always regretted not finishing a university degree after secondary school and after a family holiday to Colonial Michilimackinac (http://www.mackinacparks.com/colonial-michilimackinac/), where they have ongoing publicly-accessible archaeological excavations, my lifelong obsession with the past was reignited. A few weeks later I had applied for undergraduate programmes and was drafting my work resignation letter. I had a small family of my own at this time, so it was all or nothing: I left the old career behind and was full-steam-ahead for a new career/vocation in archaeology.

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How has a degree in archaeology benefited your career?
Since beginning my archaeological journey, I've been a constant student (except for a few months between undergrad and my MA), so my archaeological career experience is entirely academia-based. I haven't had the privilege of working for a commercial or government archaeology unit, but I've had the chance to carry out extensive fieldwork through academic projects in Jordan (Tall Hisban and Tall Jalul, with the Madaba Plains Project) and Britain (Durham-Stanford Roman Binchester Project), covering periods from the late Bronze Age to early modern era. The field experiences, academic conferences, teaching, and required research for my degrees have all provided amazing opportunities to benefit my career. I've had the opportunity to publish, to meet major players from academia and the government heritage sector, and to learn from my fellow students, including those that I've helped to teach. My primary goal is to continue in academic archaeology as a full-time lecturer or professor, combining teaching with engaging field-based research; so my degrees have been essential, but the less-tangible experiental aspect that goes along with attaining the degree are probably the most important.

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What has been the greatest success in your career so far?
I've been privileged with a lot of hard-won success, so it's difficult at this stage to say which has been the "greatest." I would have to count supervising excavations on Tall Hisban's acropolis summit a major success, as well as the organisation of a major workshop on chorography and archaeology (featuring papers by myself, Dr. David Petts, and Professors Michael Shanks, Richard Hingley and Christopher Witmore) to be held in Durham this July. One other area that I am particularly proud of is my work with the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference (TRAC): I currently serve on the TRAC Standing Committee, helping to support individual conference organisers each year, was one of the primary organisers of the 2011 conference in Newcastle, and served as co-editor of the TRAC 2011 Proceedings volume (Oxbow Books, 2012), where I also published a paper. It has been a privilege and honour to be entrusted with the job of helping to coordinate and steer an organisation that has been so influential in Roman archaeology over the past 20+ years.

Friday, 25 May 2012

Archaeology Jobs in Portugal

Archaeology Jobs in Portugal
Got any information about Archaeology jobs in Portugal? Please share here.

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

Hayley Forsyth - Career Interview

1. Where did you graduate and what are you doing now?I graduated in 2007 after studying for a BSc in archaeology from Bournemouth University, I then decided to stay on at Bournemouth and complete an MSc in osteoarchaeology. I'm now the Project Officer for Eastbourne Ancestors, a Heritage Lottery Funded project analysing over 300 human remains in Eastbournes collection with the help of volunteers, University students and academics.

2. When you graduated were you looking for a career in archaeology?Yes, I've wanted to work in archaeology from ever since I can remember, but the industry was already affected by the start of the recession in 2008 so this made things difficult. Instead I decided to start volunteering with local societies, working on my CPD and networking with professionals to build up my experience levels to make me more employable.

3. How has a degree in archaeology benefited your career?Having a degree in archaeology has given me the knowledge to understand the basics in the industry, I've then worked hard to expand my knowledge and gain experience in the field. A degree doesn't give me a free ticket to the top, I intend to work hard and start from the bottom, learning from the professionals on the way. Some professionals already working in archaeology have suggested that Universities close their courses, I would have been crushed had I not been able to study this subject at Uni as it's all I've ever wanted to do. As times are changing maybe Universities could offer more of an apprenticeship scheme with local commercial archaeology units to give students a taster of life in commercial archaeology.

4. Would you go back into Archaeology later down the line?I'm hoping to stay in archaeology now that I've got my first full time job, but if for some reason it doesn't work out I'll always try and get back into archaeology. I'm not in it for the money, I love archaeology.

Friday, 18 May 2012

Cat Jarman - Career Interview


Where did you graduate and what are you doing now?
 I graduated with a degree in Archaeology from the University of Bristol in 2004. I've just finished an MA in Archaeology at the University of Oslo, Norway, and have been awarded an AHRC studentship to study for a PhD at Bristol University starting in September this year. I'm going to be investigating a Viking site in Derbyshire through isotope analyses of human remains, looking at geographical origins, diet and mobility among the people buried there.
 
I also teach lifelong learning courses at the University of Bristol, and will be running their Introduction to Archaeology Summer School for the sixth year this July. I have two young children so I divide my time between teaching and studying  archaeology, and being a mum!  
 
When you graduated were you looking for a career in archaeology?
 Yes - I wanted to continue with research and start a career in academia. I was even offered a PhD studentship just before I graduated, but in the end it fell through as I didn't meet the research council's eligibility criteria (I hadn't lived in the UK for long enough to qualify). I started looking for other jobs in archaeology instead, but couldn't get any paid fieldwork as I had no commercial fieldwork experience. I worked in visitor services at the Roman Baths Museum for a while, and then got a job with my local library service promoting reading to families in disadvantaged areas. Not long after I had my first baby I was asked if I was interested in teaching lifelong learning courses at Bristol University, and I jumped at the opportunity to get back into archaeology! I started teaching introductory evening and  weekend courses, and developed and started teaching the Archaeology Summer School in Bristol in 2007. This inspired me to go back to study for an MA, and I decided to go to Norway, my home country, to get a different perspective on the subject. 
 
 
How has a degree in archaeology benefited your career?
 Absolutely - I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to teach the subject or continue with research without it. But when I started working in the library service I was surprised to see how my degree benefited me even in a completely  different type of work. Throughout my undergraduate course we'd always been told about the 'transferable skills' we'd come away with when we graduated, but it was not until I started working full-time that really understood what that meant!  Archaeology is  a unique subject to study as it brings together so many different skills. You have the opportunity to learn about almost every aspect of human experiences and behaviours, and the ways in which people have interacted with things, each other, and the natural world around them. In addition you learn team work, critical thinking, research, and communication skills  -  which are essential skills for success in so many careers.
 
What has been the greatest success in your career so far?
 I am delighted to be well on my way to achieving my ambition of becoming a researcher, and I am incredibly excited about starting my PhD this year. Although combining study with being a parent is hard work, it also gives me a level of flexibility I couldn't get elsewhere.

I am also proud of the success of the summer school, which has grown from something quite small in its first year to a very popular course with students from around the world! I am passionate about my subject and love teaching, and it's sharing archaeology with others that really inspires me.
 
Although it has taken a little while longer to get to where I want to be than I first expected,  I think the different jobs and roles I've had since graduating have been hugely beneficial to my career.

Monday, 14 May 2012

Archaeology Jobs in Turkey

Archaeology Jobs in Turkey

Use this space to post and read about Archaeology Jobs in Turkey.

Archaeology Jobs in China

Archaeology Jobs in China

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Archaeology Jobs in Norway

Archaeology Jobs in Norway

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Archaeology Jobs in Germany

Archaeology Jobs in Germany

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Archaeology Jobs in France

Archaeology Jobs in France

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Archaeology Jobs in Rome

Archaeology Jobs in Rome

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Archaeology Jobs in Canada

Archaeology Jobs in Canada

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Archaeology Jobs in Spain


Archaeology Jobs in Spain


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Friday, 11 May 2012

Archaeology Jobs in Italy

Archaeology Jobs in Italy

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Archaeology Jobs in Greece

Archaeology Jobs in Greece

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Archaeology Jobs in The USA

Archaeology Jobs in The USA

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Thursday, 10 May 2012

Best UK Archaeology Degrees

Best Archaeology Degrees in the UK
Please use this space to post info on what you believe are to be the best archaeology degrees in the UK.

Archaeology Careers

Archaeology Careers
Please use this page to post any info you have on Archaeology Careers! It's a hard time at the moment and any information shared helps!

Archaeology Work Experience 2013

Archaeology Work Experience 2013
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Archaeology Work Experience 2012

Archaeology Work Experience 2012
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Archaeology Internships 2012

Archaeology Internships 2012
Use this page to post any info on Archaeology Internships you know of happening in 2012.

Wednesday, 9 May 2012

Kayleigh O'Leary - Career Interview

Kayleigh O'Leary graduated from Cardiff university - we caught up with her to ask her about her career so far...
Where did you graduate and what are you doing now?
I did both my BSc and my MA at Cardiff University. I am currently working as a museum assistant for the National Museum of Wales with a six-month secondment to the department of Archaeology and numismatics.



When you graduated were you looking for a career in archaeology?
I was looking for a career in archaeology. After three months of unemployment, I decided that a career anywhere within the history and heritage sector would be acceptable and finally after six months I got the job at the museum.


How has a degree in archaeology benefited your career?
I do believe that a degree in archaeology has benefitted my career, although not necessarily the MA. Archaeology has so many transferable skills, which are helpful in gaining any type of job. For my job, I am the link between the members of the public and the museum and a deeper knowledge of one department, I believe, has helped me greatly.


Would you go back into Archaeology later down the line?
I would love to go back to archaeology. Although my secondment is, only for six months, it has reinforced my love for the subject and if I ever had the chance to work in archaeology, be that museum based or field based, then I would jump at it.

Archaeology Digs - Summer 2013

Archaeology Digs Summer 2013
 
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Archaeology Digs - Winter 2012

Archaeology Digs Winter 2012

Please use this page to post any information you may have on Archaeology digs winter 2012!

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

Stefan Sagrott Career Interview

Stefan Sagrott graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 2009. We caught up with him to ask him about his career and thoughts so far.

Where did you graduate and what are you doing now?
I graduated with a degree in archaeology from the University of Edinburgh in 2009. I had always intended to follow this up with an MSc by research and perhaps a PhD into my main interest which is hillforts. Instead I undertook a taught Msc in Environmental Sustainability, whilst working part time as an Illustrator for AOC Archaeology, and since graduating also work as a Junior Consultant.

When you graduated were you looking for a career in archaeology?
I had the misfortune to graduate a year after the global financial crisis, the construction industry in the UK had basically shut up shop and archaeology companies were downsizing drastically. I was looking for work in archaeology, as that’s all I had imagined myself doing, but there simply weren’t any jobs, so instead I ended up working in a bar for a year. Just as I’d applied to do the Masters in Environmental Sustainability, I got a call from a company I’d done some work for when I was a student, asking if I wanted a few weeks work cleaning and measuring bricks from the excavation of an industrial site. That developed into some temporary illustration work, so I went ahead with my Masters whilst working part-time as an illustrator. During my Masters I studied quite a bit on Environmental Impact Assessment, planning law and wind farms, and when I graduated I was lucky enough to not only be taken on fulltime by AOC, but also as a Junior Consultant, allowing me to put my Masters to good use.

How has a degree in archaeology benefited your career?
These days any archaeology job requires a degree, so having a degree in archaeology is essential for getting a job. A lot of what I learnt at university isn’t used on a day to day basis in my job, but it is still useful for background reference and understanding sites, as well as teaching you to research and write succinctly. Other things I learnt, such as GIS, I use on a daily basis, and I’d advise everyone who can to get some experience with GIS software. What is most useful are the contacts I made and the fieldwork I carried out during my summers. By the time I graduated I had over 6 months fieldwork experience on both research excavations and commercial excavations and this is invaluable if you’re trying to get a job in archaeology.

Would you go back into Archaeology later down the line?
At the moment I’m one of the lucky ones who gets to work in archaeology every day. It might not be the exact career I had in mind; I never considered illustration or consultancy, I always assumed I’d start off as an excavator! However I’m still considering doing a PhD eventually, although at the moment there’s no rush for anything.

Tuesday, 1 May 2012

Interview with Jaime Almansa-Sánchez

Jaime Almansa-Sánchez graduated from Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) as ‘Licenciado en Historia’ in 2006.

Where did you graduate and what are you doing now?
I graduated from Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) as ‘Licenciado en Historia’ in 2006. After starting my PhD there, I made a break to complete an MA in Public Archaeology at UCL in 2008. I’m supposed to continue writing my PhD thesis, although since 2010 I run my own commercial company in Madrid and don’t have much time.

When you graduated were you looking for a career in archaeology?
I started working in an archaeological site as a volunteer when I was 16. Since then I had no doubt I wanted to continue. During my degree, I prepared myself for a research career in different topics, until I discovered public archaeology in 2004. Anyway, since the day after I came back from my end-of-degree trip to Greece, I started working in the commercial sector for some months. That made me focus on management issues, although I enrolled a nice project in Ethiopia and kept doing very different things. When I came back from London and got rejected from my last opportunity of getting a scholarship for a PhD, I have to recognise I was about to leave. But after some weeks figuring out what to do in the middle of a crisis, I decided to start my own company and try to conduct all my projects from the commercial sector. Today I don’t see my life without (public) archaeology.

How has a degree in archaeology benefited your career?
Sometimes I think I could have been an architect and work in archaeology anyway. The social value of our work in Spain is poor, and so, we are not in a very good position to do anything. I use to complain about the lack of practical training I got in my degree (most I know I learn it working everyday) but I got something more important… the capacity of critical thinking and a strong basis to build my career. Later in UCL I had a great year to continue learning what I really wanted to, and I managed to live from it. 
I should probably differentiate two careers:
-Academic/Research: Absolutely. I could not be where I am without both degrees.
-Commercial: I feel I’m studying everyday again to manage the company. Besides the public archaeology issues, which I should treat more like research than commercial work (although I get money from them), everything else is new. It took me more than a year to adapt to simple issues like taxes and bureaucracy, and now it is overwhelming. Anyway… I keep growing little by little in the business.

Would you go back into Archaeology later down the line?
After 12 years in archaeology and all the stuff I’m getting into, I think I am in a no-return point. Of course, one day I might consider a change in the
path to settle a bit, but always in the field of archaeology; museums, universities, research centres, administration… You never know what you will be doing in the future, but I’m sure it will be in some way related to archaeology. Maybe I have to get some other jobs in the middle to survive, but once you are in, it is too vocational to just leave. I’m very lucky to be working on what I want and living from it. Many of my friends are in gyms, petrol stations or, in the best cases, schools or libraries, but all them keep involved in some project or personal research, waiting for the opportunity to come back.
It makes me very sad to see the panorama, specially now with the crisis, but we are in a profession that seems to be in some way special. It is difficult to give up. I will try not to.